UP MERMAID STREET, RYE
Limited edition hand coloured etching  
6” x 9” Edition of 50
Unframed: £95
CHURCH SQUARE, RYE
Limited edition hand coloured etching  
8” x 12” Edition of 25
Unframed: £120
DOWN MERMAID STREET, RYE
Limited edition hand coloured etching  
6” x 9” Edition of 50
Unframed: £95
View past the Mermaid Inn down Mermaid streetto the Strand, Rye East Sussex.
OLD VICARAGE, RYE
Limited edition hand coloured etching  
8” x 12” Edition of 25
Unframed: £120
The Old Vicarage (the pink building) in Church Square, Rye.
View up Mermaid street, Rye's famous medieval cobbled street.
The churchyard of St Mary's church, the most prominent building in Rye, East Sussex bordered by its Tudor buildings.
WEST STREET, RYE
Limited edition hand coloured etching  
6” x 9” Edition of 25
Unframed: £120
ANTIQUE SHOP, RYE
Limited edition etching  
6” x 9” Edition of 50
Unframed: £75
WATCHBELL STREET, RYE
Limited edition etching  
6” x 9” Edition of 50
Unframed: £75
View down the cobbles of Watchbell Street in Rye to the Hope and Anchor and Udimore in the distance.
Crumbling stonework in West street leading from church square to Lamb House in Rye
Peeling paintwork (before it was repainted!) round the windows of an antique shop in the Strand at the bottom of Mermaid Street in Rye
LANDGATE, RYE
Limited edition hand coloured etching  
8” x 12” Edition of 25
Unframed: £120
Rye’s ancient town entrance on the landward side.
CALLING TIME, RYE
Limited edition etching  
12” x 18” Edition of 75
Unframed: £195
The Piranesi-esque mechanism of the clock in the tower of St Mary’s in Rye
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RYE
The name of Rye is believed to come from Norman French "la Rie" meaning a bank. Medieval maps shows that Rye was originally located on a huge embayment of the English Channel called the Rye Camber, which provided a safe anchorage and harbour.
The River Rother originally took an easterly course to flow into the sea near what is now New Romney. Rye, as one of the two "Antient Townes" (Winchelsea being the other) was to become a limb of the Cinque Ports Confederation by 1189, and subsequently a full member. The protection of the town as one of the Cinque Ports was very important, due to the commerce that trading brought. One of the oldest buildings in Rye is Ypres Tower, which was built in order to defend the town from the French in 1249 as "Baddings Tower" and later named after its owner John de Ypres. It is now home of the Rye Museum. Rye received its charter from King Edward I in 1289, and acquired privileges and tax exemptions in return for ship service for the crown. The "Landgate" (the only surviving one of four original fortified entrances to Rye) dates from 1329 in the early years of the reign of King Edward III. Rye was originally a port but the storms of the 13th century (particularly 1250 and 1287) were to cut the town off from the sea, destroy Old Winchelsea and change the course of the Rother.
The the sea and the river combined in about 1375 to destroy the eastern part of the town and ships began use the current area (the Strand) to off-load their cargoes. Two years later the town was sacked and burnt by the French, and it was ordered that the town walls be completed as a defence against foreign raiders.
Constant work had to be undertaken to stop the gradual silting-up of the river and the harbour: Acts of Parliament had to be passed to enable it to be kept navigable. Even so, Rye was considered one of the finest of the Cinque Ports, but With the coming of bigger ships and larger ports, Rye's economy began to decline, and fishing and particularly smuggling became more lucrative. Imposition of taxes on goods had already encouraged the latter trade since 1301, but by the end of the 17th century it became widespread throughout Kent and Sussex, with wool being the largest commodity. When luxury goods were also added, smuggling became a criminal pursuit, and groups; such as the Hawkhurst Gang who met in the Mermaid Inn in Mermaid Street, turned to murder and were subsequently hanged. Taxes on alcohol and tobacco have kept the tradition alive!
Since 1803 there have been lifeboats stationed at Rye, although the lifeboat station is now at Rye Harbour approx 2 miles down river from the Rye itself. The worst disaster in its history occurred in 1928, when the Mary Stanford Lifeboat sank with all hands. The incident is recorded by a tablet at Winchelsea church; and by the folk-song The Mary Stanford of Rye.There have been six ships of the Royal Navy to bear the name HMS Rye.

Etching is one of the oldest and most satisfying forms of printmaking and in the hands of a expert can deliver intricacies of line and tone unrivalled by any other printing process.
Etchings are the prints produced by etching an image on a copper or zinc plate, using acid, filling the textures of the image with ink and then printing it on to paper by running it through a heavy press

Snow covered fields on the walk past Camber Castle to Winchelsea beach from Rye.
WINTER FIELDS NEAR RYE
Limited edition etching  
6” x 9” Edition of 50
Unframed: £75
FISHING BOATS, RYE
Limited edition hand coloured etching  
8” x 12” Edition of 25
Unframed: £120
RYE - LIMITED EDITION ETCHINGS (1993-04)
Prints of  Rye, East Sussex: The historic Cinque port of the South East coast.

COLIN BAILEY
ARTIST & PRINTMAKER
Rye
Limited edition etchings
Rye is a small hill top town and in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. Notable buildings in the town include St Mary's church, the Ypres Tower (pronounced "wipers"), Lamb House and many of the houses on Mermaid Street, Watchbell Street, and Church Square. About the Area
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Fishing boats moored next to the fish market on the Salts in Rye.
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